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To learn more about cemeteries in general, go to the Cemeteries Record Page.

Online Resources[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

Because of a lack of land, the Choa Chu Kang Cemetery is the only cemetery in Singapore still open for burials. However, even this cemetery has had many burials exhumed.

Choa Chu Kang Cemetery Office

910 Choa Chu Kang Road
Singapore 699819
Tel: 6793 7428
Fax: 6793 7400

Below is a table of some of the largest Singaporean cemeteries listed in alphabetical order.

Cemetery Name Started Groups included in the cemetery History
Armenian Church of Saint Gregory the Illuminator Memorial Gardens Cemetery 1836 The church yard was not originally used as a burial ground. However, with the exhumation of Singapore cemeteries, the graves of many Armenians were moved to the Memorial Gardens. A list of some of the burials is available here. The Armenian Church of Saint Gregory is the oldest christian church in Singapore. Several Armanians buried at other cemeteries have been relocated to this cemetery.[1]
Bidadari Cemetery 1908 Christians, Muslim, Hindu, and Sinhalese Bidadari was the main Christian cemetery. It also served the Muslim, Hindu, and Sinhalese communities. Burials were exhumed 2001-2006, and a memorial park was created to preserve the burials of prominent people who were interred there.
Bulim Suah off Old Jurong Road Private Chinese Cemetery
Bukit Brown Cemetery 1922 Public Chinese Cemetery Bukit Brown Cemetery was named after George Henry Brown, who formerly owned the land where the cemetery is located. When the cemetery closed in 1973, there were over 100,000 markers. Before becoming the Bukit Brown Cemetery, it was known as the Seh Ong (Hokkien) or Coffee Hill Cemetery, a cemetery owned by the Ong clan.[2]
Cathedral of the Good Shepherd Cemetery circ. 1840s The oldest Roman Catholic church in Singapore.
Fort Canning Cemetery 1819 Catholic and Protestant Christians. About 1/3 of the burials were Chinese Christians. Since the orginial burial register was lost, the government hired H. A. Stallwood to to copy details from the gravestones. This was published in Vol. 61 (1912) of the Journal of the Straits Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society and is available online here. The Fort Canning Cemetery composed of two different cemeteries. The first was from 1819-1822, and the second from 1822 to 1865. It closed in 1865 and later became a park. It was the first cemetery for Christians.[3]
Japanese Cemetery Park 1891 Japanese residents in Singapore Closed in 1973, the cemetery became a memorial park in 1987. The cemetery has about 910 burials.
Kranji Memorials 1940s, 1970s Includes the burials of prisoners interned at Changi and Buona Vista camps during the Japanese Occupation in WWII. World Wars I and II burials from Bidadari Christian Cemetery and others. World War II burials from the Saigon Military Cemetery in French Indochina (now Vietnam) were transferred here. A collective grave for 69 Chinese members of the British Commonwealth Forces who were killed when Singapore fell in February 1942 (Chinese Memorial in plot 44), and over 850 burials of unidentified personnel.[4] The Kranji Memorial consists of three different cemeteries: the Kranji War Cemetery, the Kranji Military Cemetery, and the State Cemetery. The Kranji War Cemetery was started by prisoners during the Japanese occupation in World War II. It was endorsed by the Army Graves Service in 1946 at the close of the war. The Kranji Military Cemetery was built in 1975, and consists of burials that were moved from the Pasir Panjang and Ulu Pandan cemeteries. There are also the burials of over 1400 servicemen and their families. There are only two burials in the State Cemetery; Yusof bin Ishak, Singapore's first president, and Benjamin Henry Sheares, Singapore's second president.[5]
Jalan Kubar Cemetery mid 1800s Prominent Malays and Muslims Consists of three different cemeteries (the Sultan's Burial Ground, Malay Burial Ground, and Indian Muslim Burial Ground).
Kubar Kassim 1920 Muslims living in Siglap.[6] The largest Muslim cemetery in Singapore.
Parsi Cemetery 1828 Paris in Singapore Started under Parsi trustees, the cemetery trust was transferred to the Muslim and Hindu Endowment Board in 1889 when the last Parsi trustees moved from Singapore. In 1954 the cemetery was transferred to the Parsi Association, and was bought by the Singapore government in 1969. Most of the burials have been moved to Tampines and later to the Choa Chu Kang Cemeteries.[7]
St. Andrews Cathedral Cemetery
St. Joseph's Church Cemetery
Teochew Cemeteries The first Teochew cemetery in Singapore, Tai Suah Ting, was started in 1845. After World War II, many of the Teochew cemeteries were destroyed as land was being used for redevelopment. In 2009, the last of the Teochew cemeteries was exhumed. Most of the bodies from Teochew cemeteries were moved to Yishun Memorial Park. 1840s Teochew citizens The first Teochew cemetery in Singapore, Tai Suah Ting, was started in 1845. After World War II, many of the Teochew cemeteries were destroyed as land was being used for redevelopment. In 2009, the last of the Teochew cemeteries was exhumed. Most of the bodies from Teochew cemeteries were moved to Yishun Memorial Park.

Listed below are some smaller cemeteries in Singapore.

Hokkien Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

Bukit Brown Cemetery Seh Lim Suah (姓林山) at Bukit Merah (1890-1967)

  • Heng Suah Teng (恒山亭), located at Silat Road
  • Hong Lim Suah (芳林山) at Bukit Merah (1870s-1960s)
  • Leng Kee Suah (麟记山) at Leng Kee Road (1885-1963)
  • Hiap Guan Suah (协源山) at Telok Blangah (1882-1967)
  • See Kar Teng (四角(脚)亭) at Jalan Membina, Tiong Bahru
  • Heng Suah Teng (恒山亭) at Silat Road (1828-1941)
  • Hokkien Lao Suah (福建老山)
  • Sin Heng Suah Teng (新恒山亭) at Toa Payoh (1880s-1920s)
  • Tai Guan Suah
  • Phuah Pak Tiong (剖腹塚) off Yio Chu Kang Road (until 1970s)
  • Hock Suah Teng (福山亭) at Upper Changi Road 10 milestone (1950s-1990s)

Jewish Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

There are a few Jewish Cemeteries in Singapore. The International Jewish Cemetery Project gives descriptions of these cemeteries:

Teochew Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

The first Teochew cemetery in Singapore, Tai Suah Ting, was started in 1845. After World War II, many of the Teochew cemeteries were destroyed as land was being used for redevelopment. In 2009, the last of the Teochew cemeteries was exhumed. Most of the bodies from Teochew cemeteries were moved to Yishun Memorial Park.

For a listing of other Singapore cemeteries click here

Additional Resources at the Family History Library[edit | edit source]

To find cemetery records for Singapore in the FamilySearch Catalog follow these steps:

  1. Go to FamilySearch Catalog
  2. Enter: Singapore in the Place box
  3. Click on: Search
  4. Click on: Singapore - Cemeteries

To find cemetery records for lower jurisdictions:

  1. Click on: Places within Singapore

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Wikipedia contributors, "Armenian Church, Singapore," in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armenian_Church,_Singapore, accessed 24 October 2019.
  2. Singapore Infopedia, "Bukit Brown Municipal Cemetery," in Singapore Infopedia, http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_1358_2009-07-13.html?s=Bukit%20Brown%20Chinese%20Cemetery, accessed 25 October 2019.
  3. Alvin Chua, "Fort Canning Cemetery," in Singapore Infopedia, http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_1685_2010-07-14.html, accessed 25 October 2019.
  4. Wong Heng, "Kranji Memorials," in Singapore Infopedia, https://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_183_2004-12-27.html?s=kranji%20cemetery, accessed 20 November 2019.
  5. Wong Heng, "Kranji Memorials," in Singapore Infopedia, https://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_183_2004-12-27.html?s=kranji%20cemetery, accessed 20 November 2019.
  6. Remember Singapore, "Past and Present Cemeteries of Singapore (Part 2) – Malay/Muslim Burial Grounds," on Remember Singapore, https://remembersingapore.org/2019/09/01/singapore-past-present-cemeteries-part-2/, accessed 20 November 2019.
  7. Marsita Omar & Bonny Tan, "Parsi Cemetery," in Singapore Infopedia, http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_1002_2009-11-02.html?s=cemetery, accessed 25 October 2019.