Union Ships U-Z

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U[edit | edit source]

Ship Name Date Type of Ship Name Changes Etc.
Umbqua. Built by contract with Snowden & Mason, Pittsburgh, Pa. Sold at auction, September 12, 1874, at New Orleans, La., to Nathaniel McKay, for $8,900. June 15, 1869, name changed from Umpqua  to Fury; August 10, 1869, renamed the Umpqua. She was commenced in 1863 and finished in September, 1866. Class: Light-draft monitor. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n247/mode/1up
Unadilla. Hull built by contract with J. Englis and Novelty Iron Works, New York, N. Y. Sold October, 1869. Commissioned September 30, 1861, at New York Navy Yard, where she went out of commission May 4, 1865. Total cost of repairs while in naval service was $19,883.73. Class: Screw steamer; gunboat; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n247/mode/1up
Uncas. Purchased September 20, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by George D. Morgan, from Dudley Buck.  Sold at public auction August 21, 1863, at New York, for $6,900. Total cost of repairs on her while in the Government service was $26,032.01. Class: Screw steamer. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n247/mode/1up
Underwriter. Purchased August 23, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by Navy Department. Captured and destroyed by Confederates February 2, 1864, on Neuse River, North Carolina. Total cost of repairs while in the Government service was $47, 294.12. Class: Side-wheel steamer. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n247/mode/1up
Undine. Purchased March 7, 1864, at Cincinnati, by Rear Admiral D. D. Porter. Captured by Confererates October 30, and burned November 4, 1864, on the Tennessee River, on the west shore, 1 mile above Reynoldsburg Island. After she was burned her two boilers were taken to the Naval Station, Mound City. All articles of value were recovered from her by Acting Volunteer Lieutenant G. W. Rogers, of the U. S. S. Kate, in August 1865.  Purchased under name of Ben Gaylord. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n247/mode/1up
Union, see Unit.
Union. Purchased, January 6, 1863, at New York, N. Y., by Rear Admiral Paulding, from P. Hargous & Co. Sold at public auction, October 25, 1865, at New York, by Burdett, Jones & Co. to W. H. Staruck for $39,500. Class: Screw steamer; wood. http://ia600506.us.archive.org/BookReader/BookReaderImages.php?zip=/12/items/cu31924080777489/cu31924080777489_jp2.

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Unit. Purchased, June 2, 1864, at Boston, Mass., by Rear-Admiral S. H. Stringham. Sold at public auction, July 12, 1865, at New York, N. Y., by Burdett, Jones & Co. to C. & E. T. Peters, for $6,750. Purchased under name of Union. June 30, 1865, repairs at Norfolk, Va., cost $4,727.11. About six months old, June 1, 1864. Number of officers, 2; men, 10; no condenser. Can carry 30 days' provisions. Steer passably well. Class: Screw steamer. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n247/mode/1up
United States, see New Berne.
United States. Built by Treasury and War Departments, at Philadelphia, Pa. Launched, May 10, 1797; completed in 1798. Ordered to be docked at Norfolk Navy Yard, December 18, 1865, and broken up immediately. This frigate was constructed under act of Congress of 1794, March 27. Dimensions were fixed by John Barry, Richard Dale, and Thomas Truxtun. The draughts and molds were made by Joshua Humphreys. The bottom was coppered and she was copper-fastened. Class: Sailing Frigate; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n248/mode/1up
Uno, see Juniper.

V[edit | edit source]

Ship Name Date Type of Ship Name Changes Etc.
Valley City. Purchased, July 26, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by George D. Morgan, from H. Atwater. Sold at public auction, August 15, 1865, at New York, by Burdett, Jones & Co., to Mr. Clyde, for $8,000. Commissioned, September 13, 1861, at New York Navy Yard. Total cost of repairs while in the Government service was $44,675.69. Class: Screw steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n248/mode/1up
Valparaiso. Purchased November 22, 1861, at New Bedford, Mass., by G. D. Morgan & R. H. Chappell, Ship. Sold at public auction, September 2, 1865, at Bay Point, S. C., by Rear-Admiral Radford, to English & Co., for $625. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n248/mode/1up
Vandalia. Commissioned November 8, 1860, at New York Navy Yard, where she went out of commission, February 4, 1863; October 17, 1863, at Portsmouth Navy Yard, as receiving and guard ship. Class: Screw steamer; sloop; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n248/mode/1up
Vanderbilt. Having been given to Government by Commodore Vanderbuilt, she was transferred, September, 1862, from war to naval service. Sold, April 1, 1873, at Mare Island, Cal., to George Howes, for $42,000 in currency. Delivered to Government, September 2, 1862, at New York Navy Yard. Total cost of alterations and repairs while in the naval service was $221,433.86. Class: Side-wheel steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n248/mode/1up
Van Houten, Peter B., see Jasmine.
Varuna. Purchased, December 31, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by George D. Morgan, from C. Millory & C. S. Bushnell. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n249/mode/1up
Velocity. Purchased September 30, 1862, by Navy Department from Key West prize court. Captured January 21, 1863, by Confederates at Sabine Pass. Class: Schooner. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n249/mode/1up
Verbena. Purchased, June 7, 1864, at New York, N. Y., by Rear Admiral H. Paulding from Thomas M. Wheeler. Sold at public auction, July 20, 1865, at Washington, to W. E. Gladwick, by William L. Wall & Co., for $8,950. Purchased under name of Ino . Commissioned, July 11, 1864, at New York Navy Yard; went out of commission, June 13, 1865, at Washington Navy Yard. There are two engine feed pumps; one hand pump; one No. 3 steam pump, with usual connection. Crank shaft runs in iron boxes, fitted with soft metal. Wrought-iron air-pump levers and convenient arrangement of levers for moving the engine by hand. Class: Screw steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n249/mode/1up
Vermont. Receiving ship at New York Navy Yard. July 30, 18864, officers of the Vermont were transferred to the New Hamphirel. Class: Sails: ship - of - the - line: wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n250/mode/1up
Vesuvius, see Tippecanoe.
Vicksburg, see Acacia.
Vicksburg. Purchased, October 20, 1863, at New York, N. Y., by Rear Admiral F. H. Gregory, from Maxon, Fish & Co. Sold at public auction, July 12, 1865, at New York, N. Y., by Burdett, Jones & Co., to C. C. & H. Cable, for $50,500. Commissioned, December 2, 1863, for North Atlantic Squadron, at New York Navy Yard, where she went out of commission, April 29, 1865. Total cost of repairs while in the naval service was $8,529.20. Class: Screw steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n250/mode/1up
Victoria, see Abraham.
Victoria. Purchased, December 26, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by George D. Morgan, from A. Degraw. Sold at public auction, November 30, 1865, at New York, by Burdett, Jones & Co., to L. A. Edwards, for $5,400. Commissioned, March 13, 1862, for North Atlantic Squadron at New York Navy Yard; went out of commission, May 4, 1865, at Norfolk Navy Yard. Total cost of repairs while in the naval service was $49,696.82. Class: Screw steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n251/mode/1up
Victory, see Queen.
Victory. Purchased, July 15, 1863, at Cincinnati, Ohio, by Rear-Admiral Porter from H. A. Jones et al. Sold at public auction, August 17, 1865, at Mound City, Ill., by Soloman A. Sliver to W. Thorwegen, for $10,900. Her original name was  Banker. July 8, 1863, she was commissioned for the Mississippi Squadron at Cincinnati, Ohio: went out of commission June 30, 1865, at Mound City, Ill. Class: Stern-wheel steamer: wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n251/mode/1up
Vincennes. Built by Government, Sold, October 5, 1867, a Boston, Mass., for $8,600. Commissioned, June 29, 1861, for West Gulf Squadron, at Boston Navy Yard, where she was ordered to be placed in ordinary, August 28, 1865 Class: Sails; sloop; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n251/mode/1up
Vindicator. Built by Government at New Albany, Ind., for Army; transferred by War Department. Sold at public auction, November 29, 1865, at Mound City, Ill., by Solomon A. Silver, to W. L. Hambleton, for $5,000. Commissioned, May 24, 1864, for Mississippi Squadron, at Mound City, Ill., Class: Side-wheel steamer; ram; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n252/mode/1up
Violet. Purchased under name of Martha, December 30, 1862, at New York, N. Y., by Rear-Admirlal H. Paulding, from E. Brandon & J. Brites. Wrecked and lost, August 7 - 8, 1864, at Western Bar Inlet, Cape Fear River, N. C. Name changed to Violet'on purchase. Total cost of repairs while in naval service was $8,490.08. Commissioned, January, 1863, for North Atlantic Squadron, at New York Navy Yard. Class: Screw steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n252/mode/1up
Virginia. Built by Government at Boston Navy Yard. Broken up, 1884, at Boston, Mass. She was never finished. Class: Sails; ship of the line; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n252/mode/1up
Virginia. Purchased, September 1, 1863, from New York prize court by Navy Department. Sold at public auction. November 30, 1865, at New York, by Burdett, Jones & Co. to Perry Brothers, for $20,000. Commissiioned, June 12, 1863, at New York Navy Yard for West Gulf Squadron. Total cost of repairs while in naval service was $10,392.61. Class: Screw steamer; iron. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n252/mode/1up
Vixen, see Neosho.
Vixen. From Coast Survey, August 26, 1861. Returned to Coast Survey. Commissioned, July 31, 1862, for South Atlantic Squadron at New York Navy Yard, where she went out of commission November 8, 1862, the date upon which she was to be repaired and turned over to the Coast Survey. Class: Side-wheel steamer. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n253/mode/1up
Volunteer. Purchased, February 29, 1864, from prize court, Springfield, Ill., by Navy Department. Sold at public auction. November 29, 1865, at Mound City, Ill., by Solomon A. Silver to B. F. Goodwin, for $9,100. Condition May 30, 1865, fair. Class: Stern-wheel steamer. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n253/mode/1up

W[edit | edit source]

Ship Name Date Type of Ship Name Changes Etc.
W. A. Healy, see Springfield.
W. C. Mann, see Elfin.
W. L. Bartlett. Purchased, August 13, 1861, at Baltimore, Md., by Captain H. S. Stellwagen. Purchased to sink. Stone Fleet. Class: Schooner. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n253/mode/1up
W. S. Hancock,  see Sorrel.
W. W. Burns. Purchased, August 13, 1861, at Baltimore, Md., by Captain H. S. Stellwagen. Purchased to sink. Stone Fleet. Class: Schooner. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n253/mode/1up
Wabash. Hull built by Government at Philadelphia Navy Yard, where she was launched. October 24, 1855; machinery by Merrick & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. She was commenced in May, 1854, and completed in September 1856. Receiving ship, 1897, Boston Navy Yard. Commissioned, May 16, 1861, at New York Navy Yard; went out of commission, February 14, 1865, at Boston Navy Yard. Class: Screw steamer; frigate; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n253/mode/1up
Wachusett. Hull built by Government at Boston Navy Yard, where she was launched, October 10, 1861; machinery, by Morgan Iron Works, New York, N. Y. Sold, July 30, 1887, at Mare Island, Cal., to W. T. Garratt & Co., for $16,501. Commissioned, March 3, 1862, at Boston Navy Yard. Commenced, June, 1861, and completed in August 1862. March 5, 1865, sailed for East Indies from Boston, Mass. Class: Screw steamer; sloop; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n254/mode/1up
Wampanoag,  see  Florida.
Wamsutta Purchased, September 20, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by George D. Morgan from H. Haldrege. Sold at public auction, July 20, 1865, at Portsmouth, N. H., by Charles Clark to Otis Seabury, for $14,500. Commissioned March 14, 1862, and April 24, 1864, at Philadelphia Navy Yard; February 2, 1863, at New York Navy Yard. Went out of commission December 3, 1862, at New York Navy Yard; September 14,1863, at Phildelphia Navy Yard; June 29, 1865, at Portsmouth, N. H., Navy Yard. Total cost of repairs while in Government service was $37,030. Class: Screw steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n254/mode/1up
Wanderer Purchased, May 1863, from Philadelphia prizze court by Navy Department. Sold at public auction, June 28, 1865, at Key West, Fla., by A. Patterson, to Packer & Watson, for $2,760. Class: Schooner. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n254/mode/1up
Wando. Purchased, November, 1864, from Boston prize court by Navy Department. Sold at public auction, November 30, 1865, at New York, by Burdett, Jones & Co., to H. Allen, for $30,200. Commissioned, December 22, 1864, at Boston Navy Yard; went out of commission, August 10, 1865, at New York Navy Yard. Cost of repairs in Boston in March, 1865, was $14,081.71 Class: Side-wheel steamer; iron. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n255/mode/1up
Warren. Sold at auction, January 1, 1863, at Panama, for $3,900. Went out of commission and turned over to Panama Railway Co., January 2, 1863. Commission for sale was $195. Class: Sailing ship; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n255/mode/1up
Wasp. Purchased, January 13, 1865, from New York prize court by Navy Department. Sold, January 5, 1876, at Montevideo, to L. B. Scheiner, for $2,548.47 Name changed, June 12, 1865, from Emma Henry to Wasp. Total cost of repairs while in naval service was $40,144.88. Was in service in South Atlantic Squadron. Thickness of iron plate in bottom, 3/8"; finished cranks. Cast-iron pillow block built into deck frame; wrought-iron columns. Engine room on main deck, conveniently arranged. Auxiliary steam pump and distilling apparatus; all pipes of stout copper; feed and bilge pumps attached to engines; four funaces to each boiler; water-tight partitions, fore and aft, to each boiler; two vibrating side wheels. Class: Side-wheel steamer; iron. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n255/mode/1up
Wassuc. Built by contract with G. W. Lawrence, Portland, Me.,  where she was launched July 25, 1865. September 9, 1875, to be cut up by Power & Co. Delivered at Boston Navy Yard, November, 1865. Total cost of repairs while in the naval service was $26,342.29. Name changed from Wassuc to Stromboli,  June 15, 1869; August 10, 1869, renamed Wassuc. Class: Light-draft monitor. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n255/mode/1up
Watch. Purchased October 3, 1861, at New York from A. C. Powell by George D. Morgan. Sold at public auction July 5, 1865, at Washington to Robert Lear by William L. Wall & Co., for $2,600. Purchased under name of A. C. Powell;  changed to Alert, during which time she was burned at Norfolk Navy Yard August 31, 1863; raised the hull and rebuilt her. February 2, 1865, name changed to Watch. Went out of commission, May 26, 1865. Total cost of repairs while in the Government service was $14, 680.55. Class: Screw steamer. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n256/mode/1up
Wateree. Built by contract with Reaney, Son and Archbold, Chester, Pa., where she  was launced August 12, 1863. Delivered to the Government at Philadelphia Navy Yard December 29, 1863. Standed by a tidal wave August 13, 1868, at Arica, Peru; and sold to William Parker, November 21, 1868, for $2,775. Commissioned, January 20, 1864, at Phildelphia Navy Yard. Total cost of repairs while in naval service was $36,798.14. Class: Side-wheel steamer; gunboat; iron. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n256/mode/1up
Water Witch. Hull built by Government at Washington Navy Yard, where she was launched in 1852; machinery, by William M. Ellis. Captured, 2 A. M., June 6, 1864, in Ossabaw Sound, Ga., Lieutenant-Commander A. Pendergrast, commanding. Commissioned April 10, 1861, and September 6, 1862, at Philadelphia Navy Yard; June 3, 1863, at New York Navy Yard. Went out of commission February 19, 1862, at New York Navy Yard and April 14, 1862, at Philadelphia Navy Yard. Class: Side-wheel steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n256/mode/1up
Wave. Purchased, November 14, 1863, at Cincinnati, Ohio, by Rear Admiral D. D. Porter. Purchased, November 14, 1863, at Cincinnati, Ohio, by Rear Admiral D. D. Porter. Captured, May 6, 1864, at Calcasieu Pass, Texas. Name changed from Argosy No. 2  to Wave. Class: Side-wheel steamer; tinclad. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n257/mode/1up
Waxsaw. Built by contract with A. & W. Denmead & Son, Baltimore, Md. Launched May 4, 1865. Ironclad. Broken up by John Roach, for which he was paid $3,720, August 25, 1875, at New York. Total cost of repairs while in naval service was $431,37. Name changed June 15, 1869, to Niobe. The above cost price includes all alterations, extra work, and two extra gun carriages. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n257/mode/1up
Weehawken. Built by contract with Zeno Secor & Co., Jersey City, N. J., where she was launched November 5, 1862. Sunk, December 6, 1863, off Morris Island, S. C. For extra work, sundries, labor, and materials, $65,110.73, was allowed. On passage from New York to Hampton Roads, January 19-22, 1863, she encountered a severe gale, her behaviour during which was reported by Captain John Rodgers as easy, buoyant and indicative of thorough strength and safety. Class: Screw steamer; single turret monitor; wood and iron. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n257/mode/1up
Western World. Purchased September 21, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by George D. Morgan, from S. Schuyler. Sold at public auction, June 24, 1865, at Washington, by William L. Wall & Co., to H. R. Haxelhurst, for $24,500. Commissioned January 3, 1862, at New York Navy Yard; November 14, 1864, at Washington Navy Yard. Went out of commission November 17, 1863, and May 26, 1865, at Washington Navy Yard. Total cost of repairs while in the Government service was $49,642.89. Class: Screw steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n257/mode/1up
Westfield. Purchased, November 22, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by George D. Morgan from C. Vanderbilt. Blown up at Galveston, Texas, January 1, 1863, to prevent falling into hands of enemy. Fitted for naval service by J. A. Westervelt, at New York for $27,500. Class: Side-wheel steamer. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n257/mode/1up
Wheeler, see Alpha.
Whitehall Purchased October 10, 1861, at Brooklyn, N. Y., by Navy Department. Destroyed, March 10, 1862, by fire, at Old Point, Va. December 10, 1862, the wreck of the Whitehall was lying at Mill Creek, Va. She was entirely torn to pieces. Class: Side-wheel steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n258/mode/1up
Whitehead. Purchased October 17, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by George D. Morgan from D. B. Martin. Sold at public auction, August 10, 1865, at Philadelphia, Pa., by Samuel C. Cook, for $4,500. Commissioned, November 19, 1861, at Norfolk Navy Yard; went out of commission, June 29, 1865, at Philadelphia Navy Yard. Total cost of repairs while in the Government service was $17,018.44. Class: Screw steamer; tinclad; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n258/mode/1up
White Rose,  see Siren.
Wild Cat. Prize. Never libeled. Sold, tender, July 28, 1865, at Charleston, S. C., by Rear Admiral Radford, for $1,500. Class: Sails; wood, copper fastened. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n258/mode/1up
Wilderness. Purchased at New York by Rear Admiral Gregory, May 30, 1864. Sold at Boston, Mass., September 9, 1865, to Treasury Department, by Admiral Stringham, for $31,000. Purchased as the B. N. Creary. Total cost of repairs while in the naval service was $7,246.27. Behaves very well in a gale; steers very easily and well; rolls moderately. She is rather slight built; not very strong. Class: Side-wheel steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n258/mode/1up
Willet Rowe,  see Iris.
William Bacon. Purchased, September 6, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by George D. Morgan, from Van Brunt & Slaght. Sold at public auction July 20, 1865, at Washington, D. C., by William L. Wall & Co., to Mr. White, for $5,600. Commissioned February 3, 1862, at New York Navy Yard; went out of commission June 17, 1865, at Washington Navy Yard. Repairs on her to January 1, 1863, cost $20,609.53. At a cost of $4,738.16 altered for naval service. Class: Sailing schooner; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n259/mode/1up
William Badger. Purchased, May 18-22, 1861, at New Bedford, Mass., by Commander S. L. Breese, from Henry F. Thomas. Sold at public auction, October 17, 1865, at Beaufort, S. C., by Tomas C. Allen, to Captain James Abel, for $1,650. Total cost of repairs while in the Government service was $3,197.91. Formerly whale ship. Class: Sails; storeship. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n259/mode/1up
William G. Anderson. Purchased, August 23, 1861, at Boston, Mass., by board composed of J. M. Forbes et al. Sold, tender after aucion, August 28, 1866, at New York, by John Lenthal, to A. A. Low & Brother, for $12,600. Commissioned, October 2, 1861, at Boston Navy Yard. Captured the C. S. privateer Beauregard,  November 12, 1861. Total cost of  repairs while in Government service was $12,873.34. Class: Sails; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n259/mode/1up
William G. Fargo,  see Honeysuckle.
Wm. G. Putnam. Purchsed, July 24, 1861, at New York, from Mr. Hammond, by George D. Morgan. Sold, tender after auction, to Light-house Board, June 20, 1865, for $8,000, by Navy Department. Name changed from General Putnam  to William G. Putnam. Total cost of repair while in the naval service was $26,639.43. Engine and boiler in good order; hull tight and strong; she was yellow-metaled in 1863. Protected from musketry by iron plates around the forecastle, quarter deck, and wheelhouse. Class: Side-wheel steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n259/mode/1up
William H. Brown. Transferred, September 30, 1862, by War Department. Sold at public auction, August 17, 1865, at Mound City, Ill., by Solomon A. Silver, to R. R. Hudson et al., for $10,700. Class: Side-wheel steamer. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n260/mode/1up
William L. Jones. Purchased, August 13, 1861, at Baltimore, Md., by Captain H. S. Stellwagen Purchased to sink. Stone fleet. Class: Schooner. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n260/mode/1up
William Lee. Purchased, November 19, 1861, at Newport, R. I., by G D. Morgan & R. H. Chappell. Ship. Purchased to sink. Stone fleet. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n260/mode/1up
Willie Gamage, see Gamage.
Winnebago. Built by contract with James B. Eads, at St. Louis, Mo., where she was launched, July 4, 1863. Sold at public auction September 12, 1874, at New Orleans, La., to Nathaniel McKay, for $7,350. Contract price was $313,000; the above given price includes all extras. For extra iron plating, Mr. Eads was allowed $13,087.85. Name changed to Tornado, June 15, 1869; renamed Winnebago, August 10,1869. She was laid up, September 27, 1865, on the Algiers side of the Mississippi River, 1 mile below Slaughter House Point. Class: Steamer; double-turreted monitor; ironclad. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n260/mode/1up
Winnipec. Built by contract with H. Loring, Boston, Mass., where she was launched, August 20, 1864. Sold, June 17, 1869, to Thomas Clyde. Cost of extra work and repairs while in naval service was $44,034.50. Class: Side-wheel steamer; double-ender; iron. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n260/mode/1up
Winona. Built by contract with C. & R. Poillon and Allaire Works, New York, N. Y. August 16, 1865, ordered to Portsmouth Navy Yard, to be laid up; November 22, 1865, ordered to New York, where she was sold, November 30, 1865. Delivered, November 26, 1861, at New York Navy Yard, where she was put in commission December 11, 1861. Went out of commission, June 9, 1865, at Portsmouth Navy Yard. Total cost of repairs while in naval service was $22,262.75. Class: Screw steamer; gunboat; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n260/mode/1up
Winooski. Hull built by Government at Boston Navy Yard, where she was launched, July 30, 1863; machinery by contract with Gardner & Lake, Providence, R. I. Completed, May 8, 1863. Sold, August 26, 1868, to John Mullen, for $19,100. Date of contract for machinery was October 8, 1862. Total cost of repairs while in naval service was $33,428.70. Class:Side-wheel steamer; double-ender; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n260/mode/1up
Wissahickon. Built by contract with John Lynn and Merrick & Sons, Phildelphia, Pa., where she was launched, October 2, 1861. Sold at public auction, October 25, 1865, at New York, for $13,000. Commissioned, November 25, 1861, at Philadelphia Navy Yard, where she was delivered to Government, November 12, 1861. Class: Screw-steamer; gunboat; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n260/mode/1up
Wonder, see Nettle.
Wyalusing. Hull built by contract with C. H. & W. M. Cramp; machinery by contract with Pusey, Jones & Co., Wilmington, Del. Sold, October 15, 1867, at Philadelphia, Pa., for $15,000. Commissioned February 8, 1864, at Philadelphia Navy Yard; went out of commission June 10, 1865, at New York Navy Yard. Cost of repairs while in naval service was $6,500.03. Class: Side-wheel steamer; double-ender; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n260/mode/1up
Wyandank. Purchased, September 12, 1861, at Brooklyn N. Y., by George D. Morgan from Union Ferry Co. Broken up, in 1879, at Annapolis, Md. Total cost of repairs while in naval service was $37,323.15. Class: Side-wheel steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n262/mode/1up
Wyandotte. Sold at auction July 12, 1865, at New York, N. Y., for $10,000. Name changed from Westernport  to Wyandotte, June 14, 1859. Purchased for Paraguay expedition. Commissioned, December 31, 1861, at New York Navy Yard. Went out of commission September 24, 1861, and June 3, 1865, at New York Navy . Class: Screw steamer; 3d class; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n262/mode/1up
Wyoming. Hull built by Government at Phildelphia Navy Yard, where she was launched January 19, 1859; machinery by contract with Merrick & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. Commenced in July, 1858, and completed in October, 1859, Sold, May 16, 1892. Heretofore used as a storeship at Port Royal, S. C., the Wyoming has been turned over to the Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md., to be used as a practice ship, and can no longer be considered among the effective vessels of the Navy Class: Screw steamer; 2d-class sloop: wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n262/mode/1up

Y to Z[edit | edit source]

Ship Name Date Type of Ship Name Changes Etc.
Yankee. Purchased, June 1, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by Navy Department. Sold at public auction September 15, 1865, at Washington, D. C., by William L. Wall & Co., to George B. Collier, for $6,400. Went out of commission, May 16, 1865, at Washington Navy Yard. Cost of repairs while in naval service was $12, 183.96. Class: Side-wheel steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n263/mode/1up
Yantic. Hull built by Government at Philadelphia Navy Yard, where she was launched March 19, 1864; machinery by Merrick & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa., under contract dated September 25, 1861. Commissioned for North Atlantic Squadron August 12, 1864, at Philadelphia Navy Yard. Total cost of repairs to January 1, 1889, was $389,458.02. Class: Screw steamer; gunboat; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n263/mode/1up
Yazoo. Built by contract with Merritt & Sons, Philadelphia, Pa. Sold, September 5, 1874, at Philadelphia, Pa., to A. Purvis & Son, for $28,000. The above cost price includes $3,400 for gun carriages. Total cost of repairs was $542.86. December 20, 1865, ordered to be laid up at League Island. Name changed from Yazoo to Tartar, June 15, 1869; renamed Yazoo,  August 10, 1869. Class: Light draft monitor. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n263/mode/1up
Young America, see Shawsheen.
Young America. urchased, from Boston prize court, in 1864, by Navy Department. Sold at public auction, July 12, 1865, at New York, N. Y., by Burdett, Jones & Co., to Camden & Amboy Railroad Co., for $7,800. Captured by the U. S. S. Cumberland, April 24, 1861, while assisting a schooner to elude the blockade. Commissioned for North Atlantic, January 27, 1864; went out of commission, June 9, 1865, at Norfolk Navy Yard. Class: Screw steamer; tug; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n263/mode/1up
Young Rover. Purchased, July 27, 1861, at Boston, Mass., by a Board composed of J. M. Forbes et al. Sold at public auction, June 22, 1865, at Boston, Mass., by Horatio Harris & Co., to Mr. Curtis, for $19,250. Commissioned, September 10, 1861, at Boston Navy Yard. Total cost of repairs while in the Government service was $58,492.74. Class: Screw steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n264/mode/1up
Yucca. Purchased, February 25, 1865, at Boston, Mass., by Rear Admiral Stringham, from Donald McKay. Sold, August 26, 1888, at Portsmouth, N. H., to R. M. Funkhauser, for $9,500. Commissioned, April 3, 1865, at Boston Navy Yard. Total cost of repairs while in the naval service was $10,379.42. Class: Screw steamer; gunboat; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n264/mode/1up
Yuma. Built by contract with Alexander Swift & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. Sold at public auction September 12, 1874, at New Orleans, La., to Theodore Allen, for $10,075. Name changed from Yuma to Tempest, June 15, 1869; thence to Yuma, August 10, 1869. The cost price given above includes $3,400, paid for gun carriages. Class: Light-draft monitor. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n264/mode/1up
Zeta. Purchased June 3, 1864, at Philadelphia, Pa., by Commodore C. K. Stribling, from William S. Mason and others. Sold at auction, June 24, 1865, at Washington, D. C., for $4,450, to G. Vanderwerken, by William L. Wall & Co. Purchased under name of Loane, thence to  Zeta; also known as Tug No. 6.  Purchased to use as a picketboat on James River. Engine needs repairs; hull in fair order; is not coppered. Steers well; has no fresh water condenser; can carry two month's provisions. Class: Screw steamer; picket boat; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n264/mode/1up
Zouava, see Pink.
Zouava. Purchased, December 20, 1861, at New York, N. Y., by George D. Morgan. Sold at public auction, July 12, 1865, at New York, N. Y., by Burdett, Jones & Co., to M. O. Roberts, for $9,000. Went out of commission, June 14, 1865, at  New York Navy Yard. Total cost of repairs while in the Government service was $25,058,5 Class: Screw steamer; wood. http://archive.org/stream/cu31924080777489#page/n265/mode/1up

References[edit | edit source]