Watauga County, North Carolina Genealogy

From FamilySearch Wiki
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Guide to Watauga County, North Carolina ancestry, genealogy and family history, birth records, marriage records, death records, census records, family history, and military records.

County Facts
County seat: Boone
Organized: 1849
Parent County(s): Ashe, Caldwell, Wilkes, and Yancey [1]
Neighboring Counties
Ashe  • Avery  • Caldwell  • Johnson (TN)  • Wilkes
See County Maps
Courthouse
NorthCarolinaWataugaCourthouse.jpg
Location Map
Nc-watauga.png
Adoption
Adopt-a-wiki page
Logonew small.gif This page adopted by:
NCGenWeb Project
who welcome you to contribute.
Adopt a page today

County Information[edit | edit source]

Description[edit | edit source]

The county was named for the Watauga River, whose name is said to be a Native American word, the translations that range from among them, beautiful water, whispering waters, village of many springs, and river of islands. It is located in the northwestern corner of the state.

County Courthouse[edit | edit source]

Watauga County Courthouse
842 W. King Street
Boone, NC 28607-3531
Phone: 828-265-8052
Watauga County Website

Register of Deeds has birth and death records from 1914, marriage records from 1872 and land records.
Clerk of Superior Court has divorce, probate and court records from 1872.[2]

Watauga County, North Carolina Record Dates[edit | edit source]

Information for this chart was taken from various sources, often containing conflicting dates. This information should be taken as a guide and should be verified by contacting the county and/or the state government agency.

Known Beginning Dates for Major County Records[3]
Birth* Marriage Death* Court Land Probate Census
1914 1872 1914 1872 1830 1872 1784
Statewide registration for births and deaths started in 1913. General compliance by 1920.

Record Loss[edit | edit source]

1873 Courthouse fire destroyed all of the land records and most of the court records.

For suggestions about research in places that suffered historic record losses, see:

Boundary Changes[edit | edit source]

For animated maps illustrating North Carolina county boundary changes, "Rotating Formation North Carolina County Boundary Maps" (1664-1965) may be viewed for free at the MapofUS.org website.

Populated Places[edit | edit source]

For a complete list of populated places, including small neighborhoods and suburbs, visit HomeTown Locator. The following are the most historically and genealogically relevant populated places in this county:[5]

Towns
Unincorporated communities
Census-designated places
Townships
  • Bald Mountain
  • Beaverdam
  • Bethel
  • Blowing Rock
  • Blue Ridge
  • Boone
  • Brushy Fork
  • Cove Creek
  • Deep Gap
  • Meat Camp
  • New River
  • North Fork
  • Shawneehaw
  • Stony Fork
  • Todd


History Timeline[edit | edit source]

The area that became Watauga and Ashe counties was part of Anson County during the early period; part of Rowan County in 1753, Surry County in 1771, Wilkes County in 1777 and was briefly part of the State of Franklin Genealogy from 1784-89. After Franklin it was claimed as part of Washington (TN) County (part of the Southwest Territory, and later Tennessee) until it was annexed back by North Carolina into Wilkes County again in 1792.[6] Ashe was incorporated as a separate entity by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1799. North Carolina erected Watauga County primarily from Ashe County in 1849.

Resources[edit | edit source]

Bible Records[edit | edit source]

Biographies[edit | edit source]

Business, Commerce, and Occupations[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries[edit | edit source]

Cemeteries of Watauga County, North Carolina online and in print
Tombstone Transcriptions Online
Tombstone Transcriptions in Print (Often more complete)
List of Cemeteries in the County
See North Carolina Cemeteries for more information

 

Census Records[edit | edit source]

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1850 3,400
1860 4,957 45.8%
1870 5,287 6.7%
1880 8,160 54.3%
1890 10,611 30.0%
1900 13,417 26.4%
1910 13,556 1.0%
1920 13,477 −0.6%
1930 15,165 12.5%
1940 18,114 19.4%
1950 18,342 1.3%
1960 17,529 −4.4%
1970 23,404 33.5%
1980 31,666 35.3%
1990 36,952 16.7%
2000 42,695 15.5%
2010 51,079 19.6%
Source: "Wikipedia.org".


Church Records[edit | edit source]

Ward and Branch Records (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints)

  • Howard's Chapel


List of Churches and Church Parishes

Court Records[edit | edit source]

Directories[edit | edit source]

Emigration and Immigration[edit | edit source]

Ethnic, Political, and Religious Groups[edit | edit source]

Funeral Homes[edit | edit source]

Genealogies[edit | edit source]

Guardianship[edit | edit source]

Land and Property Records[edit | edit source]

Local Histories[edit | edit source]

Maps and Gazetteers[edit | edit source]

NC Watauga

Migration[edit | edit source]

Early migration routes to and from Watauga County for European settlers included:[7]

Military Records[edit | edit source]

Revolutionary War

Civil War

Regiments. Men in Watauga County served in various regiments. Men often joined a company (within a regiment) that originated in their county. Listed below are companies that were specifically formed in Watauga County:

- 1st Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry, Company D
- 5th Regiment, North Carolina Senior Reserves, Company G

World War I

World War II

Naturalization and Citizenship[edit | edit source]

Newspapers[edit | edit source]

Obituaries[edit | edit source]

Other Records[edit | edit source]

Periodicals[edit | edit source]

Probate Records[edit | edit source]

Online Probate Records

School Records[edit | edit source]

Yearbooks

Social Security Records[edit | edit source]

Tax Records[edit | edit source]

Vital Records[edit | edit source]

Birth[edit | edit source]

Marriage[edit | edit source]

Death[edit | edit source]

Divorce[edit | edit source]

Research Facilities[edit | edit source]

Archives[edit | edit source]

Listed below are archives in Watauga County. For state-wide archival repositories, see North Carolina Archives and Libraries.

Family History Centers[edit | edit source]

Family History Centers provide one-on-one assistance, free access to center-only databases, and to premium genealogical websites.
FamilySearch Affiliate Libraries have access to most center-only databases, but may not always have full services normally provided by a family history center.

Local Centers and Libraries

Libraries[edit | edit source]

Listed below are libraries in Watauga County. For state-wide library facilities, see North Carolina Archives and Libraries.

Museums[edit | edit source]

Societies[edit | edit source]

Listed below are societies in Watauga County. For state-wide genealogical societies, see North Carolina Societies.

  • Genealogical Society of Watauga County
    PO Box 126
    Boone, NC 28607
  • Watauga County Historical Society
    E. Mast, 253 Wm. Hardy Mast Road
    Sugar Grove, NC 28679-9707
    Website

Websites[edit | edit source]

Research Guides[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), North Carolina.At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  2. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), North Carolina.At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  3. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), Watauga County, North Carolina. Page 506-514 At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002; Alice Eichholz, ed. Ancestry’s Red Book: American State, County, and Town Sources, Third ed. (Provo, Utah: Ancestry, 2004), 505-509.
  4. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), North Carolina.At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  5. Wikipedia contributors, "Watauga County, North Carolina," in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watauga_County,_North_Carolina, accessed 1 March 2020.
  6. Arthur L. Fletcher, Ashe County: A History (Jefferson, N.C.: Ashe County Research Assoc., 1963), 33-34.
  7. Handybook for Genealogists: United States of America, 10th ed. (Draper, Utah: Everton Pub., 2002), North Carolina.At various libraries (WorldCat); FHL Book 973 D27e 2002.
  8. Genealogical Society of Utah, Parish and Vital Records List (July 1998). Microfiche. Digital version at https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/images/f/f5/Iginorthcarolinap.pdf.