Difference between revisions of "Austria Emigration and Immigration"

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''[[Austria]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Austria_Emigration_and_Immigration|Emigration and Immigration]]''  
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''[[Austria Genealogy|Austria]] [[Image:Gotoarrow.png]] [[Austria_Emigration_and_Immigration|Emigration and Immigration]]''  
  
 
Austrian emigration patterns have been difficult to determine. There was no state known as Austria until 1918; prior to then the sprawling Habsburg Empire, an amalgam of a dozen nationalities, encompassed the idea of Austria. Thus Austrian immigration can rightly be seen as the immigration of Czech, Polish, Hungarian, Slovenian, Serbian, and Croatian peoples as well as a plethora of other national and ethnic groups.  
 
Austrian emigration patterns have been difficult to determine. There was no state known as Austria until 1918; prior to then the sprawling Habsburg Empire, an amalgam of a dozen nationalities, encompassed the idea of Austria. Thus Austrian immigration can rightly be seen as the immigration of Czech, Polish, Hungarian, Slovenian, Serbian, and Croatian peoples as well as a plethora of other national and ethnic groups.  

Revision as of 14:28, 2 February 2015

Austria Gotoarrow.png Emigration and Immigration

Austrian emigration patterns have been difficult to determine. There was no state known as Austria until 1918; prior to then the sprawling Habsburg Empire, an amalgam of a dozen nationalities, encompassed the idea of Austria. Thus Austrian immigration can rightly be seen as the immigration of Czech, Polish, Hungarian, Slovenian, Serbian, and Croatian peoples as well as a plethora of other national and ethnic groups.

The Austrian Americans website provides a historical overview of immigration to America.

Sometimes it is possible to guess where an immigrant originated through surname distribution maps.