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Nicaragua Church Records

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For information about records for non-Christian religions in Nicaragua, go to the Religious Records page.

Online Resources and Websites[edit | edit source]



Historical Background[edit | edit source]

  • Religion in Nicaragua is predominantly Christian and forms a significant part of the culture of the country as well as its constitution. Nicaraguan constitutions have provided for a secular state and guaranteed freedom of religion since 1939, but the Roman Catholic Church has retained a special status in Nicaraguan society. Religious freedom and religious tolerance is promoted by both the Nicaraguan government and the constitution.
  • Nicaraguan constitutions have provided for a secular state and guaranteed freedom of religion since 1939, but the Roman Catholic Church has retained a special status in Nicaraguan society.
  • Membership of evangelical Protestant groups and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has been growing rapidly since the 1990s. There is a significant LDS missionary effort in Nicaragua. There are two missions and 95,768 members of the LDS Church (1.54% of the population).
  • There are also strong Anglican and Moravian communities on the Caribbean coast in what once constituted the sparsely populated Mosquito Coast colony. It was under British influence for nearly three centuries. Protestantism was brought to the Mosquito Coast mainly by British and German colonists in forms of Anglicanism and the Moravian Church.
  • By 1990 more than 100 non-Roman Catholic faiths had adherents in Nicaragua, of which the largest were the Moravian Church, the Baptist Convention of Nicaragua, and the Assemblies of God.
  • Other denominations included the Church of God, the Church of the Nazarene, the Episcopal Church, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons), Jehovah's Witnesses, and the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Most of these churches have been established through the efforts of missionaries from the United States and, although now institutionally independent and led by Nicaraguans, retain strong links with members of the same denomination in the United States.[1] [2]



Information Recorded in the Records[edit | edit source]

Different denominations, different time periods, and practices of different record keepers will effect how much information can be found in the records. This outline will show the types of details which might be found (best case scenario):

Baptisms[edit | edit source]

In Catholic and Anglican records, children were usually baptized a few days after birth, and therefore, the baptism record proves date of birth. Other religions, such as Baptists, baptized at other points in the member's life. Baptism registers might give:

  • baptism date
  • the infant's name
  • parents' names
  • father's occupation
  • status of legitimacy
  • occasionally, names of grandparents
  • names of witnesses or godparents, who may be relatives
  • birth date and place
  • the family's place of residence
  • death information, as an added note or signified by a cross

Marriages[edit | edit source]

Marriage registers can give:

  • the marriage date
  • the names of the bride and groom
  • indicate whether the bride and groom were single or widowed
  • their ages
  • birth dates and places for the bride and groom
  • their residences
  • their occupations
  • birthplaces of the bride and groom
  • parents' names (after 1800)
  • the names of previous spouses and their death dates
  • names of witnesses, who might be relatives.

Burials[edit | edit source]

Burial registers may give:

  • the name of the deceased
  • the date and place of death or burial
  • the deceased's age
  • place of residence
  • cause of death
  • the names of survivors, especially a widow or widower
  • deceased's birth date and place
  • parents' names, or at least the father's name





How to Find Records[edit | edit source]

Digital Copies of Church Records in the FamilySearch Catalog[edit | edit source]

Watch for digitized copies of church records to be added to the collection of the FamilySearch Library. Some records might have viewing restrictions, and can only be viewed at a Family History Center near you, and/or by members of supporting organizations. To find records:

a. Click on the records of Nicaragua.
b. Click on Places within Ni caragua and a list of towns will appear.
c. Click on your town if it appears, or the location which you believe was the parish which served your town or village.
d. Click on the "Church records" topic. Click on the blue links to specific record titles.
e. Some combination of these icons will appear at the far right of the listing for the record. FHL icons.png. The magnifying glass indicates that the record is indexed. Clicking on the magnifying glass will take you to the index. Clicking on the camera will take you to an online digital copy of the records.

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

You will probably need to write to or email the national archives, the diocese, or local parish priests to find records. See the Spanish Letter Writing Guide for help with composing letters.


Anglican (Episcopal) Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Iglesia Anglicana de la Region Central de America
Apartado 1207
Managua, MN
Nicaragua

Phone: +505 22225174
Fax:+505 22545248
E-mail: secretaria_diocesana@hotmail.com

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

Anglicans are geographically concentrated in the Nicaraguan part of the Mosquito Coast. There are strong Anglican and Moravian communities on the Caribbean coast in what once constituted the sparsely populated Mosquito Coast colony. It was under British influence for nearly three centuries. Protestantism was brought to the Mosquito Coast mainly by British and German colonists in forms of Anglicanism and the Moravian Church. [3] [4]

Assembly of God (Pentecostal) Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

The largest non-Catholic church is the Assemblies of God (Pentecostal). Pentecostals churches represent close to 10 percent of all Christians.[5]

Baptist Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

The Baptist Convention of Nicaragua is a Baptist Christian denomination in Nicaragua. It is affiliated with the Baptist World Alliance. The headquarters is in Managua. The Baptist Convention of Nicaragua has its origins in a mission of the American Baptist International Ministries in 1917. It is officially founded in 1937. In 2016, it had 290 churches and 75,000 members. [6]

Catholic Records[edit | edit source]

Online Resources and Websites[edit | edit source]

Ancestry.com, findmypast.com, and MyHeritage.com can be searched free of charge at your local family history center or the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Writing to a Local Parish[edit | edit source]

To locate the mailing address or e-mail address for a local parish, consult:

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

  • Roman Catholicism came to Nicaragua in the sixteenth century with the Spanish conquest and remained, until 1939, the established faith. The Catholic Church in Nicaragua is the Nicaraguan part of the worldwide Catholic Church, under the spiritual leadership of the Pope, curia in Rome, and the Conference of Nicaraguan Bishops.
  • There are 2,652,985 Catholics in Nicaragua - approximately 58,5%[1] of the total population according to the INEC.[2] The country is divided into seven dioceses including one archdiocese.
  • Evangelization of Nicaragua began shortly after the Spanish conquest. In 1532, the first bishop took jurisdiction in that country. Jesuits were the leaders in mission work in the colonial period, which last till the 1820s. After Nicaragua became a republic in 1838, evangelization intensified, reaching the Atlantic coastline.[7]



The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Records[edit | edit source]

Online Records[edit | edit source]

Online church information is available to current members, deceased members, and immediate family members who are still living. Sign in to FamilySearch and then select Family Tree in the drop-down menu.

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

The first missionaries arrived in Nicaragua in 1953. The first convert was baptized the following year. In September 1978, civil war forced missionaries to leave the area. Work resumed in the late 1980s. Membership was approximately 3,500 when the Nicaragua Managua Mission was organized in October 1989. Membership increased to 8,000 by December 1990. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) has been growing rapidly since the 1990s. There is a significant LDS missionary effort in Nicaragua. There are two missions and 95,768 members of the LDS Church (1.54% of the population). [8][9]

Moravian Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Iglesia Morava en Nicaragua
Puerto Cabezas RAAN
Nicaragua

Office phone / FAX: 505-792-2222
Email: coraantoniom@yahoo.es
Superintendent: Rev. Cora Antonio

Historical Background[edit | edit source]

Moravians are geographically concentrated in the Nicaraguan part of the Mosquito Coast. There are strong Anglican and Moravian communities on the Caribbean coast in what once constituted the sparsely populated Mosquito Coast colony. It was under British influence for nearly three centuries. Protestantism was brought to the Mosquito Coast mainly by British and German colonists in forms of Anglicanism and the Moravian Church. [10] [11]

Moravian presence in Nicaragua dates back to 1847, when German Moravian missionaries started work in Bluefields. From the beginning, their work developed among the ethnic groups of the Caribbean coast: the Afro-Caribbeans, and Miskito, Sumu and Rama Indians, which is why today 96 percent of the membership of the Moravian church is in this area. In 1899 the first Nicaraguan pastor was ordained. During the first world war communication became difficult and the mission board in Herrnhut (Germany) decided, in 1916, to transfer the responsibility of administration and finance to the Moravian Church in the USA. In 1949, the first Nicaraguan bishop was consecrated. In 1958, churches were also established on the Pacific side of the country, starting in Managua. In 1972, the leadership and administration of the MCN passed into the hands of a native pastor, and the church became completely autonomous in 1974. [12]

Seventh-day Adventist Church Records[edit | edit source]

Writing for Records[edit | edit source]

Central Nicaragua Mission
Physical address: Four blocks above Velez Paiz's Hospital, Managua, Nicaragua
From the Club Terrace traffic lights, 2 blocks down, and 2 blocks south, Villa Fontana, Managua, Nicaragua
Mailing Address Apartado 92, Managua, Nicaragua

Phone: 505-2265-0174; 505-2265-2002 505-2265-0174; 505-2265-2002
Email: info@macdenic.org Website

References[edit | edit source]

  1. Wikipedia contributors, "Religion in Nicaragua", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_Nicaragua, accessed 25 February 2020.
  2. Wikipedia contributors, "Nicaragua", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicaragua, accessed 25 February 2020.
  3. Wikipedia contributors, "Religion in Nicaragua", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_Nicaragua, accessed 25 February 2020.
  4. Wikipedia contributors, "Nicaragua", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicaragua, accessed 25 February 2020.
  5. "Nicaragua", "World Council of Churches", https://www.oikoumene.org/en/member-churches/latin-america/nicaragua, accessed 25 February 2020.
  6. Wikipedia contributors, "Baptist Convention of Nicaragua", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baptist_Convention_of_Nicaragua, accessed 25 February 2020.
  7. Wikipedia contributors, "Catholic Church in Nicaragua", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catholic_Church_in_Nicaragua, accessed 25 February 2020.
  8. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, "Facts and Statistics: Nicaragua, https://newsroom.churchofjesuschrist.org/facts-and-statistics/country/nicaragua, accessed 20 February 2020.
  9. Wikipedia contributors, "Nicaragua", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicaragua, accessed 25 February 2020.
  10. Wikipedia contributors, "Religion in Nicaragua", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religion_in_Nicaragua, accessed 25 February 2020.
  11. Wikipedia contributors, "Nicaragua", in Wikipedia: the Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicaragua, accessed 25 February 2020.
  12. Moravian Church in Nicaragua", World Council of Churches, https://www.oikoumene.org/en/member-churches/moravian-church-in-nicaragua, accessed 25 February 2020.