Difference between revisions of "Scandinavia Vaccination"

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=='''Vaccination for Smallpox (Kopper)'''==
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==Vaccination for Smallpox (Kopper)==
  
 
*The translation for "vaccination for smallpox" is vaccinerede.
 
*The translation for "vaccination for smallpox" is vaccinerede.
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The vaccination date itself can also help you determine your ancestor.
 
The vaccination date itself can also help you determine your ancestor.
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For more information on vaccination records in Denmark, see the article [[Vaccinationsprotokol]].
  
 
[[Category:Scandinavia]]
 
[[Category:Scandinavia]]

Latest revision as of 09:03, 15 July 2019

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Vaccination for Smallpox (Kopper)[edit | edit source]

  • The translation for "vaccination for smallpox" is vaccinerede.

The vaccine for smallpox was developed in 1794 by Edward Jenner. Because this disease was such a fearsome killer and because people did not know then how it was spread, some Scandinavian officials would not let people marry unless they could prove they'd been vaccinated or had had the disease naturally.

The vaccination date may have been listed to the side of, or as part of, the birth or christening record. It may additionally be listed on the confirmation, engagement, or marriage record. Ages when a person received the vaccination could range from a few weeks to up into their 20s or even much beyond. This record can be valuable in that it might list date and place of birth or christening, name of father, and other information.

The vaccination date itself can also help you determine your ancestor.

For more information on vaccination records in Denmark, see the article Vaccinationsprotokol.